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Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security

Computer Systems Security

PREP FOR SECURITY+ and NETWORK+ AT CTU

CTU's Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security (BSCS) degree with a concentration in Computer Systems Security is designed to help students develop the knowledge and skills to examine and take measures against hacking, spam, worms, malware and computer viruses through cyber sleuthing and evidence gathering.

Information systems play an important role in supporting commerce, banking, telecommunications, healthcare and national security. Coursework in this curriculum focuses on preparing students to work with both technical experts and management to secure the information which is considered essential to the business objectives of an enterprise.

Obtaining your Security+ Certification can provide you with an internationally recognized credential that demonstrates your competency in IT security issues. Obtaining your Network+ Certification can provide you with an internationally recognized credential that demonstrates your competency in managing, maintaining, troubleshooting, installing and configuring basic network infrastructure. This CTU degree program offers a curriculum designed in accordance with standards set by CompTIA, the leading independent provider of IT certifications in the world.

Coursework is designed to prepare you with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the Security+ and Network+ certification exams.*

National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cybersecurity 2014-2021.

*CTU does not guarantee third-party certifications.  Certification requirements for taking and passing certification examinations are not controlled by CTU but by outside agencies and are subject to change by the agencies without notice to CTU.  Therefore, CTU cannot guarantee that graduates will be eligible to take certification examinations, regardless of their eligibility status upon enrollment.

  •  Classes start October 04, 2015

  • Checkmark iconTotal Credits186

  • Program Availability

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Program Details
  • Overview
  • Courses
  • Related Degrees
  • Tuition
  • Career Paths

Information systems play an important role in supporting commerce, banking, telecommunications, healthcare, and national security. As our reliance on computers increases and technology grows more sophisticated, the need for cyber security experts becomes critical to protect users and keep personal information out of the hands of hackers and safe from cyber threats. The Bachelors of Science in Cyber Security is designed to help students acquire and apply the latest methods, techniques, and tools for securing the public and private sector.

Outcomes: Core

  • Evaluate computer and information security needs for an organization
  • Implement continuous network monitoring and provide real-time security solutions
  • Assess risk management policies to ensure adequate protection of critical assets and information
  • Measure the performance of security systems within an enterprise-level computer network
  • Maintain, troubleshoot, and update enterprise-level security systems
  • Formulate, update, and communicate short and long term enterprise cyber security strategies
  • Conduct risk and vulnerability assessments through the analysis of advanced threats and deploy countermeasures

Outcomes: Concentration:

  • Explain the computer architecture of a modern desktop or server to include the CPU, memory, and storage systems
  • Describe the homeland security program and organization for the United States
  • Construct programs in C++ to include fundamental algorithms and data structures
  • Construct apps for mobile devices
  • Analyze computer network architectures
  • Construct static and dynamic web sites
Degree Requirements
Courses: General Education
COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

4.5

ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

4.5

ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

4.5

ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

4.5

HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

4.5

IT254 Spreadsheet Applications

4

MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

4.5

MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

4.5

MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

4.5

MATH301 Data Driven Statistics

4.5

PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

4.5

SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences

4.5

SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability

4.5

SCI203 Environmental Science and Sustainability - Laboratory Course

1.5

SCI103 Science and Technology - Laboratory Course

1.5

SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

4.5

UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

4.5

or
HUMNELE Humanities Elective

4.5

General Education Credit Hours: 70
Courses: Core
CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security

4

CSS200 Principles of Network Security

4

CSS250 Security Risk Management

4

CSS260 Scripting with Perl

4

CSS300 Vulnerability Assessment and Management

4

CSS321 Software Assurance

4

CSS332 Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security

4

CSS350 Computer Forensics I

4

CSS351 Computer Forensics II

4

CSS380 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning

4

CSS410 Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security

4

CSS441 Security Compliance

4

CSS450 Security Capstone

4

Core Credit Hours: 52
Courses: Concentration
CJUS254 Introduction to Homeland Security

4

CE242 Computer Architecture

4

CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

4

CS115 Programming With C++

4

CS126 Unix Fundamentals

4

or
CS146 Introduction to UNIX

4

CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

4

CS230 Data Structures

4

CS265 Algorithms

4

CS310 Programming Mobile Apps

4

CS340 Operating Systems

4

CS366 Software Engineering Methods

4

EM200 Introduction to Website Development

4

IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

4

IT305 Advanced Networking

4

Tech Electives Select two CSS or CS or IT courses

8

Concentration Credit Hours: 64
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 186
The BSCE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone: (410) 347-7700.
Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS)
The University curriculum for this program has been certified by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) for education standards in computer systems security as follows:
NSTISSI-4011
National Training Standard for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, dated 20 June 1994
CNSSI-4012
National Information Assurance Training Standard for Senior Systems Managers, dated June 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4012, dated August 1997
CNSSI-4013
National Information Assurance Training Standard For System Administrators (SA), dated March 2004
CNSSI-4014
Information Assurance Training Standard for Information Systems Security Officers, dated April 2004; Supersedes NSTISSI No. 4014, dated August 1997
CNSSI-4016
National Information Assurance Training Standard For Risk Analysts, dated November 2005

COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

This course covers technical and professional writing. Students review and prepare a wide variety of documents including abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Special attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

Knowing how the economy actually operates is critical for success in any career and as an educated person. Every day, the "economy" is in the news, governing what happens in politics, in the workplace and in the quality of individual lives. This course will address the dynamics of how our economy works (or does not work.) The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real versus potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Students will learn the impact of the economy on different economic sectors that affect their career paths.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

This course addresses how to write to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for writing assignments. The course begins with an introduction of the writing process and gives students the opportunity to practice writing in different modes. Students learn to develop their grammar and writing concepts to enable them to write effectively both in academic and professional contexts. . This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each other’s' work.
This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. In both Composition courses, Research Skills/ Information Literacy workshops will introduce students to the critical 21st century skill of research: how to use dictionaries and other reference books and how to access online databases of the CTU library for academic and professional inquiry.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

This course builds upon ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating college level research skills and writing essays that convey information, make a point, or provide an opinion. Students study the APA Handbook, learn about plagiarism, and conduct research, accurately citing CTU resources. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice critically reading and evaluating texts. This is a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others’ work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical thinking and reading skills. Research/Information Literacy Skills: The Information Literacy workshops challenge students to use the library’s resources to find credible resources, , and allow them to learning about important writing and research skills such as evaluating and summarizing information from sources.

Prerequisites

ENGL101   or ENGL111   or ENGL125

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

Today's news is tomorrow’s history, a maxim that strikes at the heart of our historical experience and how it affects current events. This course focuses on the key people, social experiments and technologies that continue to impact our lives. Particular attention is paid to the latter half of the 20th Century and the dawn of a new millennium in America – a time that, through the lens of history, both gives us pause and inspires hope for the future.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

IT254 Spreadsheet Applications

In today's dynamic and complex business environment, the ability to understand matrix thinking and manipulate data on an Excel spreadsheet are taken for granted as a condition of success. Electronic spreasheets are used in a variety of business calculations to analyze, graph, and manage data. Applications of spreadsheets can be used to generate reports to maintain large amounts of data, make accurate calculations, and accelerate repetitive tasks. This course is designed to introduce the basic computer spreadsheet application skills, with an emphasis on essential design, format, functions, and formulas of spreadsheet operations in solving real-world problems.

Prerequisites

MAT143 or MATH143   or MATH140 OR MATH140-L or MAT150 or MATH150   or MATH105 or MATH102   or MATH106   or MATH112

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

MATH109 begins with a review of arithmetic operations on signed numbers and fractions. Students are introduced to the idea of using symbols for numbers and to basic transformations of algebraic expressions. The skills of expanding, factoring, and simplifying algebraic expressions are applied to the solving of linear and simple quadratic equations. Linear relationships between real life quantities are studied, both from the graphical and the algebraic point of view. Elementary rules for exponents, simple roots and basic operations on rational expressions are used to simplify expressions. The course ends with an introduction to solving quadratic equations by factoring and by quadratic formula.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

MATH112 begins with a complete review of elementary algebra. It continues with simplifying rational and radical expressions. Functions are introduced, including their definition, general properties of zeroes, extreme values, symmetry, transformations, and graphs. Special attention is given to linear, rational, radical, and quadratic equations. Additional topics include computation with complex numbers and solving systems of linear equations with matrices and determinants. a graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH109   or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

This course studies problems that involve finite or discrete data sets. Logic and set notation form a foundation for creating structure in data storage and information retrieval. Tools used include truth tables, methods of proof, Venn diagrams, Big-Oh functions, graphs, trees, paths, and matrices. Additional topics include defining formal languages and recognizing syntactically correct sentences. Additional techniques include automata, digraphs, state transition tables and context free grammars.

Prerequisites

MATH112   or MATH110

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH301 Data Driven Statistics

An elementary coverage of statistical techniques is augmented at each step with the aid of technology for data processing and analysis in making inferences. Graphical presentation and statistical measures are studied, followed by basic probability concepts leading to binomial and normal distributions. Hypothesis testing is applied to drawing inferences for one and two population parameters. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH106, or MATH108, or MATH112; or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of moral and ethical theories and concepts. The coursework and course discussions will encourage students to solve ethical dilemmas by identifying and applying moral and ethical theories. Moreover, students will be encouraged to explain their reasoning from cultural, professional, and personal standpoints. Ethical theories covered will include virtue ethics, deontology (Kant’s theory), utilitarianism and social contract theory.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences

Science drives our lives. Many of the key quality of life advances we experience in the Western world come through scientific inquiry and the scientific method that drives that thirst for invention and innovation. This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in and foster an appreciation for the many dynamic disciplines –such as chemistry, physics, biology, environmental science, astronomy, geology – within this robust field. Students explore the basic tenets of scientific thinking, including the Scientific Method as well as other quantitative and qualitative approaches to enable them to draw meaningful conclusions about the world around them.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

SCI103

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability

This course will analyze the interrelationships between the natural environment and human activities. In this course, students will learn about the preservation and conservation of natural resources and the resilience of the natural environment with respect to the carrying capacity of the earth. Furthermore, students will explore topics related to environmental ethics and apply principles of sustainability to issues impacting natural resources and biodiversity. Finally, this course will provide a holistic approach in learning about environmental problems and rehabilitation through individual and group behavioral changes and environmental regulations.

Prerequisites

SCI101

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SCI203 Environmental Science and Sustainability - Laboratory Course

This course is a hands-on learning experience that complements the Environmental Science and Sustainability Course. Labs include both problem-based activities and critical-thinking projects and are designed to help students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the complex issues that comprise the field of Environmental Science and Sustainability.

Prerequisites

SCI101

Corequisites

None

Credits

1.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SCI103 Science and Technology- Laboratory Course

This is a hands-on learning experience that complements the Science and Technology course. Since the course addresses how scientific thinking and the resultant technology has changed modern life, this lab will provide students with experiences in the scientific approaches of different sciences covered such as: biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy. This lab will be constructed specifically to extend the learning from each phase of the Science and Technology course, providing hands-on experiences which deepen students’ familiarity with the scientific method and way of asking questions and solving problems.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

SCI101

Credits

1.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

This introductory course brings perspectives of the social sciences to bear on understanding group behavior. The course examines society using theoretical and methodological principles and applications that distinguish sociology from other social sciences. Learners gain insight into unique aspects of cultural and social interaction across the globe, while examining negative aspects of social control, deviance and crime, and authority. Information presented explains how culture, values, roles, norms, social interaction, and social stratification influence everyday life through careers, community, and family.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

UNIV104 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students acquire effective tools and develop skills necessary for academic success; integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security

This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics.

Prerequisites

IT204

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS200 Principles of Network Security

This course identifies and explains technical issues involved in network security. It also covers the fundamentals of wireless networking protocols, their security issues and threats. Covered topics include cryptography applications; access control; firewalls; key management network security issues; application, e-mail and middleware security; wireless local area network technologies.

Prerequisites

IT204   and CSS150

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS250 Security Risk Management

This course addresses the concepts of risk management. The course explores general methodologies used to assess and manage risks to information security. The course also identifies the activities involved in the process of information security risk management for a business organization. Activities such as detection, recovery and damage control methods will be explored.

Prerequisites

CSS200

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS260 Scripting with Perl

This course will introduce students to using Perl, a popular and flexible scripting language, to manipulate the principle types of structured data encountered in library work: delimited, MARC, and XML. Students will learn the ability to read and understand Perl programs for maintenance and update purposes.

Prerequisites

MATH103  or MATH112  or MATH143  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS300 Vulnerability Assessment and Management

This course surveys tools and techniques designed to detect intrusion into an organization's computer systems. In the hands-on lab component of the course, students will use a number of public domain and commercially available security tools. The course examines common attack methods, general inadequacies in various systems to include commercial intrusion detection systems. Utilization of the risk assessment process for determining cost effective vulnerability solutions is emphasized.

Prerequisites

CSS200   or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS321 Software Assurance

Software is essential to the operation of the commercial, government and military sectors of our nation. It is estimated that 90 percent of reported security incidents result from exploits against defects in the design or code of software. Therefore, ensuring the integrity of software is imperative to protecting the infrastructure of these sectors from threats and vulnerabilities. This course uses the Security Development Model, to identify and implement security activities that must be applied during each phase of a software development lifecycle model. Static analysis tools, testing strategies and auditing processes used for verification of secure code are applied in a test environment. Management’s role in the development of techniques for the enforcement of software assurance processes is explored.

Prerequisites

CSS150   and IT106

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS332 Database and Web Vulnerabilities and Security

This course is the study of security issues related to databases and web applications. The students will learn to identify security issues related to both environments, understand the impact and the dangers of the vulnerabilities, and design and implement techniques to protect the database, the web application and the user. Students will demonstrate their competencies by developing real world projects.

Prerequisites

CSS300   or CSS321

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS350 Computer Forensics I

This course introduces the student to the field of computer forensics. It covers the history of computer forensics and how the use of electronic evidence can support criminal investigation. The course examines procedures for investigating computer and cyber crime and concepts for collecting, analyzing, recovering and preserving forensic evidence.

Prerequisites

CJUS141   or CSS150

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS351 Computer Forensics II

This course is a more in-depth study of the technical aspects of computer forensics. Its focus is the examination and analysis of data on computer storage media. It covers current computer forensic tools, digital evidence controls, computer forensic analysis and recovering files.

Prerequisites

CSS350

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS380 Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning

This course provides students with a background on each of the following topics: disaster recovery issues as they impact business, possible threats, categories of disruptions, results from the assessment, disaster recovery plan, developing a recovery team, backup alternatives, facility backups, electronic vaulting, off-site storage, testing and drills, maintenance, phases of planning for recovery, preventions.

Prerequisites

CSS150

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS410 Cloud Computing, Privacy and Security

This course examines cloud computing: risk management; compliance and legal responsibilities of remotely stored, processed and maintained data; life cycle management; and disaster recovery planning from the perspective of the user and the cloud provider. The course also addresses handling of incidents and remediation, application security, encryption issues, storage, virtualization mechanisms and vulnerabilities, and access control in the cloud environment.

Prerequisites

CSS300  and IT204

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS441 Security Compliance

This course covers the identification, interpretation and application of federal and state government regulations, directives and acts as they apply to the security of digital systems. The course also examines the application of hardware and software tools in the monitoring and auditing of employee behavior to enforce compliance of an organization’s policies, procedures and guidelines. Applicable certification and accreditation processes are researched including commercial certifications, ISO 27002 and DIACAP.

Prerequisites

CSS200

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CSS450 Security Capstone

The capstone applies and integrates the contents of classes taken throughout the program. Projects will simulate a professional work environment.

Prerequisites

Senior Status

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CJUS254 Introduction to Homeland Security

An introduction to the theory and practice of homeland security in both the public and private sector at the national, regional, state, and local level. An overview of the administrative, legislative, and operational elements of homeland security programs and processes (including a review of homeland security history, policies, and programs) is provided. The course will touch on the following sub-disciplines within the enterprise: counterterrorism, emergency management, public health, transportation security, maritime security, border security, and critical infrastructure protection, as well as the agencies, organizations and institutions involved in these fields.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Security Studies
×

CE242 Computer Architecture

This course studies computer organization and design. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, memory system organization and architecture, computer interfacing and multiprocessing.

Prerequisites

Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

This course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a computer programming language. Solutions will be implemented using the essential elements of a modern programming language. Students will also be introduced to the techniques of designing and documenting a problem solution.

Prerequisites

MATH103  or MATH112  or MATH143  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS115 Programming With C++

Students are introduced to the C++ programming language in this course. The course includes the basic concepts of both the structured programming and object-oriented programming models. Emphasis is on applying sound software engineering principles. Basic declarations and statements, control structures, data and program design, arrays, text strings, pointers, abstraction, classes and objects are covered. Students are required to complete several programs.

Prerequisites

CS104  or Approval; MATH103  or MATH112  or MATH143 

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS126 Unix Fundamentals

In this course, students explore end user interaction with the UNIX operating system. This course examines the basic features of the UNIX operating system, UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, the UNIX shells, and shell programming. It also draws comparisons between UNIX and Linux.

Prerequisites

IT106  or CS104

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS146 Introduction to UNIX

This course introduces the UNIX operating system and examines its basic features. Students learn common UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, UNIX editors, and the UNIX shells and are introduced to shell script programming. The course requires the preparation of several exercises using the UNIX environment.

Prerequisites

IT106  or CS104

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in CS115. The focus is on the more powerful features of C++ including I/O formatting, file I/O, overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, templates and exceptions. A major emphasis is on object-oriented program design, construction and test. Students are required to complete numerous programs using these advanced features.

Prerequisites

CS115

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS230 Data Structures

In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs.

Prerequisites

IT152

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS265 Algorithms

Students are introduced to the basic concepts of algorithm design analysis, including searching and sorting, hashing and information retrieval. Average and asymptotic behaviors are discussed. Complexity issues are explored.

Prerequisites

CS230   or CS235; MATH200   or MATH203

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS310 Programming Mobile Apps

This course addresses the commonalties and differences between the development process and workflow, application design methodology and principles, as well as the implementation tools for mobile computing as contrasted with those for desktop computing. A project that considers the development processes and constraints of mobile computing will be undertaken. Each student builds a solution to a problem involving mobile computing, which is then presented to the simulated concerned stakeholders.

Prerequisites

CS215, CS216, or IT215

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS340 Operating Systems

In this course, analysis of the design of modern operating systems is emphasized. The topics covered include basic capabilities of multi-program operating systems, virtual memory, resource allocation and management, concurrent processes and threads, protection, file systems, batch and interactive subsystems. Completion of the course requires the student to perform several lab exercises that investigate and exercise key operating system features.

Prerequisites

CE242; CS215  or CS216   or IT215  or IT252

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS366 Software Engineering Methods

Software Engineering Methods introduces students to the basic concepts of software engineering including lifecycles, methodologies, techniques, and tools. This course provides an overview of requirements engineering, software design, implementation, testing, and the maintenance of software development products.

Prerequisites

CS215  or IT215  or EBUS215  or CS216   or IT252

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EM200 Introduction to Website Development

Web development is a broad field and this class provides a basic foundation for follow-on web related classes. The focus for this class is to produce and manipulate actual code creation with HTML5 and CSS3 (or updated industry web standards) for structuring/presenting content on the web. W3C provides industry guidelines related to current web design practices and standards. Students employ, interpret, manipulate and generate HTML5 and CSS3 code using Notepad++ or TextWrangler (Mac platform) or other industry standard text editor. Students will learn the history of the Internet, the various iterations of HTML web mark-up language to the current version, HTML5. The use of Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Language for formatting web content will be emphasized. The creation of complete one or more web sites to utilizing the variety of web element will be required.

Prerequisites

IT106  or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

This course serves as an introduction for students to acquire a foundation in current data communication and networking technologies. The course provides an introduction to the hardware, media, Ethernet, addressing, IP Configuration, components, and connections of a network. Network concepts such as network topologies, and major protocols, as well as the basic functions of network administration and operation are covered.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

IT305 Advanced Networking

This course focuses on routers, router configuration, and routing protocols by continuing to advance concepts of Cisco routing and introducing students to Juniper router configuration. Emphasis will be placed on the configuration of routers, managing router hardware and software, and the network infrastructure, identifying and configuring routing protocols based on organizational needs, and the configuration of access control lists (ACL).

Prerequisites

IT205  or IT204   or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

Computer Systems Security is just one of the industry-relevant concentrations CTU offers in the Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security degree program. Choose the option below that best supports your educational goals.

$60,450 Tuition (when offered 100% online)

We understand that paying for your education is an investment in your future. To make it easy to understand, CTU includes the cost of all books in our published tuition for all of our online degrees.*

See an admissions advisor for tuition when offered on campus.

Cost of this degree may be reduced based on one or more of the following:

*Fees not included in the published tuition rate. Visit our tuition resources page for links to full tuition, books and fees.
**Financial aid available for those who qualify

If you want to achieve more in your career, you have to own every opportunity— starting with the right bachelor’s degree program. Potential career paths for those who earn a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security degree include:1

  • Information Security Analyst
  • Information Security Engineer
  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Administrator
  • Database Administrator
  • Network Engineer
  • Network Specialist
  • Database Engineer
  • Database Analyst
Relevant Institutional/Programmatic Accreditation
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1http://www.burning-glass.com/realtime; The career titles are provided by Burning Glass. These results are based upon an analysis of over 7 million current job listings compiled from over 17,000 sources – the world’s most comprehensive repository of job openings. Students who earn this degree should not view this list as exhaustive and are not limited to only these options post-graduation. Some career titles listed above may not be entry-level and may require further education or job experience.

2Alumni Survey - 2012 CTU Alumni Career Progression Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in designated years between 2002 and 2011.

3Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in designated years between 2002 and 2011.

4Employer Survey - 2011 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2010 CTU graduates.

5Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2011 CTU graduates.

*CTU has been designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cybersecurity for academic years 2014-2021 for its cybersecurity and information assurance programs 

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