Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Computer science and software engineering professionals are in demand1 as firms rely more and more on new technology. Put yourself at the top of this rapidly growing industry1 with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. In addition to important undergraduate foundation studies, you can learn computer programming languages, computer network systems and software engineering skills. The systems security and project management components of this degree add competitive, industry-current skill sets to your knowledge base.

Relevant Institutional/Programmatic Accreditation
CTU is institutionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission www.hlcomission.org

  • Classes start

  • Total Credits 

    183
  • Program Availbility

    Colorado Springs | Denver

Program Details

Program Outline
Courses
Career Paths
Alumni Experience
Employer Experience
  • Program Outline

    The core courses for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree are focused on providing a holistic overview of industry-relevant skills to those who aspire to work in computer science. Core courses include:

    • Computer Architecture
    • Problem Solving Concepts With C++
    • Programming With C++ or C# Programming
    • Introduction to UNIX
    • Intermediate C++ Programming or Intermediate C# Programming
    • Data Structures
    • Fundamentals of Database Systems
    • Algorithms
    • Operating Systems
    • User Interface Design
    • Software Engineering Methods or Software Processes
    • Object Oriented Methods
    • Software Requirements Engineering
    • Software Design
    • Software Testing
    • Computer Science Project I
    • Software Engineering Capstone II
    • Web Development I
    • Fundamentals of Networking
    • Computer Networks and Communications
    • Linear Algebra
    • Project Management Tools
    • Select 16 credits of approved technical electives

    View this degree in the catalog for a full course listing.

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  • Courses

    Degree Requirements
    Courses: General Education
    ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

    4.5

    ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

    4.5

    COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

    4.5

    ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

    4.5

    HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

    4.5

    LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life

    4.5

    or
    HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts I

    4.5

    MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

    4.5

    MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

    4.5

    MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry

    4.5

    MATH116 Foundations for Calculus

    4.5

    MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

    4.5

    PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

    4.5

    PSYC102 Introductory Psychology

    4.5

    or
    SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

    4.5

    SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences

    4.5

    SCI103 Science and Technology- Laboratory Course

    1.5

    SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability

    4.5

    SCI203 Environmental Science and Sustainability - Laboratory Course

    1.5

    UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

    4.5

    or
    HUMNELE Humanities Elective

    4.5

    General Education Credit Hours: 75
    CE242 Computer Architecture

    4

    CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

    4

    or
    CS107 Problem Solving Concepts with Python

    4

    CS115 Programming With C++

    4

    or
    CS116 C# Programming

    4

    or
    CS117 Programming in Python

    4

    CS146 Introduction to UNIX

    4

    CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

    4

    or
    CS216 Intermediate C# Programming

    4

    or
    CS217 Intermediate Python Programming

    4

    CS230 Data Structures

    4

    CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems

    4

    CS265 Algorithms

    4

    or
    CS340 Operating Systems

    4

    CS310 Programming Mobile Apps

    4

    CS366 Software Engineering Methods

    4

    or
    SWE410 Software Processes

    4

    CS377 Object Oriented Methods

    4

    CS381 Software Requirements Engineering

    4

    CS382 Software Design

    4

    CS383 Software Testing

    4

    CS481 Computer Science Project I

    4

    CS482 Software Engineering Capstone II

    4

    EM200 Introduction to Website Development

    4

    IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

    4

    IT300 Computer Networks and Communications

    4

    MATH304 Linear Algebra

    4

    PM220 Project Management Tools

    4

    ELE Programming Breadth elective: Select CS246 or CS316

    4

    TECH ELE Select 16 Credits of approved Technical Electives

    16

    Core Credit Hours: 108
    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 183

    ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

    Knowing how the economy actually operates is critical for success in any career and as an educated person. Every day, the "economy" is in the news, governing what happens in politics, in the workplace and in the quality of individual lives. This course will address the dynamics of how our economy works (or does not work.) The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real versus potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Students will learn the impact of the economy on different economic sectors that affect their career paths.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

    This course addresses how to write to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for writing assignments. The course begins with an introduction of the writing process and gives students the opportunity to practice writing in different modes. Students learn to develop their grammar and writing concepts to enable them to write effectively both in academic and professional contexts. . This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each other’s' work.
    This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. In both Composition courses, Research Skills/ Information Literacy workshops will introduce students to the critical 21st century skill of research: how to use dictionaries and other reference books and how to access online databases of the CTU library for academic and professional inquiry.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

    This course covers technical and professional writing. Students review and prepare a wide variety of documents including abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Special attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

    This course builds upon ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating college level research skills and writing essays that convey information, make a point, or provide an opinion. Students study the APA Handbook, learn about plagiarism, and conduct research, accurately citing CTU resources. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice critically reading and evaluating texts. This is a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others’ work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical thinking and reading skills. Research/Information Literacy Skills: The Information Literacy workshops challenge students to use the library’s resources to find credible resources, , and allow them to learning about important writing and research skills such as evaluating and summarizing information from sources.

    Prerequisites

    ENGL101 or ENGL111 or ENGL125

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

    Today's news is tomorrow’s history, a maxim that strikes at the heart of our historical experience and how it affects current events. This course focuses on the key people, social experiments and technologies that continue to impact our lives. Particular attention is paid to the latter half of the 20th Century and the dawn of a new millennium in America – a time that, through the lens of history, both gives us pause and inspires hope for the future.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    LITR201 Literature: A Reflection of Life

    This course is about how literature can illuminate issues and themes and provide life lessons for people that broaden and deepen their own insights from experience. Students will learn how to read texts for the essential elements of expression, voice, form, theme and character and how to articulate an intelligent response to a piece of fiction, which includes short stories and poetry. They will reflect on how reading can provide a means to understanding one’s self, others, our culture and the way diverse perspectives add to learning. Students will be asked to reflect on how developing a reading practice can enhance their professional career options. They will explore how finding one’s authentic voice in fiction can be a profound expression of the experience of being human

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    HUMN201 Introduction to the Fine Arts I

    This introductory course provides a variety of experiences designed to present the fine arts in historical and contemporary cultural perspectives. Exposure to some of the great works of both western and non-western cultures will be featured, improving the students’ abilities to express opinions of the fine arts in their everyday lives.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education

    Notes

    Curriculum aligns with the Colorado State Department of Higher Education requirements for participation in the "guaranteed transfer" (gtPathways) program.
    ×

    MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

    MATH109 begins with a review of arithmetic operations on signed numbers and fractions. Students are introduced to the idea of using symbols for numbers and to basic transformations of algebraic expressions. The skills of expanding, factoring, and simplifying algebraic expressions are applied to the solving of linear and simple quadratic equations. Linear relationships between real life quantities are studied, both from the graphical and the algebraic point of view. Elementary rules for exponents, simple roots and basic operations on rational expressions are used to simplify expressions. The course ends with an introduction to solving quadratic equations by factoring and by quadratic formula.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

    MATH112 begins with a complete review of elementary algebra. It continues with simplifying rational and radical expressions. Functions are introduced, including their definition, general properties of zeroes, extreme values, symmetry, transformations, and graphs. Special attention is given to linear, rational, radical, and quadratic equations. Additional topics include computation with complex numbers and solving systems of linear equations with matrices and determinants. a graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

    Prerequisites

    MATH109 or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry

    MATH114 is a college-level course on trigonometry. The six trigonometric functions are studied from both a right triangle and unit circle approach. Applications are stressed, using graphs, triangles, and trigonometric identities. Computations with complex numbers in polar form, and vectors in the plane are introduced. Along with MATH116, this course prepares students for Calculus. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

    Prerequisites

    MATH112 or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH116 Foundations for Calculus

    Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied in detail. The concept of a composite and inverse function is explored. Other topics covered include: polynomial division, partial fractions, conic sections, sequences, series, and parametric equations. Along with MATH114, this course prepares students for Calculus. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

    Prerequisites

    MATH112 or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

    This course studies problems that involve finite or discrete data sets. Logic and set notation form a foundation for creating structure in data storage and information retrieval. Tools used include truth tables, methods of proof, Venn diagrams, Big-Oh functions, graphs, trees, paths, and matrices. Additional topics include defining formal languages and recognizing syntactically correct sentences. Additional techniques include automata, digraphs, state transition tables and context free grammars.

    Prerequisites

    MATH112 or MATH110

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

    This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of moral and ethical theories and concepts. The coursework and course discussions will encourage students to solve ethical dilemmas by identifying and applying moral and ethical theories. Moreover, students will be encouraged to explain their reasoning from cultural, professional, and personal standpoints. Ethical theories covered will include virtue ethics, deontology (Kant’s theory), utilitarianism and social contract theory.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    PSYC102 Introductory Psychology

    Psychology is fundamental to every field in academic study. This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of human behavior as well as emotional and cognitive development. Emphasis is on the self, providing a personal frame of reference for developing an understanding of human thoughts, emotions, and actions. Coursework emphasizes terminology, principles, and theories that comprise modern concepts of introductory psychology. Discussions and class projects encourage critical thinking into normal and abnormal human behavior. Students achieve a stronger synthesis of information through the study of practical, real-world application of course concepts within their professional, personal, and relational lives.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

    This introductory course brings perspectives of the social sciences to bear on understanding group behavior. The course examines society using theoretical and methodological principles and applications that distinguish sociology from other social sciences. Learners gain insight into unique aspects of cultural and social interaction across the globe, while examining negative aspects of social control, deviance and crime, and authority. Information presented explains how culture, values, roles, norms, social interaction, and social stratification influence everyday life through careers, community, and family.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    SCI101 Introduction to the Sciences

    Science drives our lives. Many of the key quality of life advances we experience in the Western world come through scientific inquiry and the scientific method that drives that thirst for invention and innovation. This course is designed to provide foundational knowledge in and foster an appreciation for the many dynamic disciplines –such as chemistry, physics, biology, environmental science, astronomy, geology – within this robust field. Students explore the basic tenets of scientific thinking, including the Scientific Method as well as other quantitative and qualitative approaches to enable them to draw meaningful conclusions about the world around them.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education

    Notes

    Curriculum aligns with the Colorado State Department of Higher Education requirements for participation in the "guaranteed transfer" (gtPathways) program.
    ×

    SCI103 Science and Technology- Laboratory Course

    This is a learning experience that complements the Science and Technology course. Since the course addresses how scientific thinking and the resultant technology has changed modern life, this lab will provide students with experiences in the scientific approaches of different sciences covered such as: biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy. This lab will be constructed specifically to extend the learning from each unit of the Science and Technology course, providing experiences which deepen students’ familiarity with the scientific method and way of asking questions and solving problems.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    1.5

    Distribution

    General Education

    Notes

    Curriculum aligns with the Colorado State Department of Higher Education requirements for participation in the "guaranteed transfer" (gtPathways) program.
    ×

    SCI201 Environmental Science and Sustainability

    This course will analyze the interrelationships between the natural environment and human activities. In this course, students will learn about the preservation and conservation of natural resources and the resilience of the natural environment with respect to the carrying capacity of the earth. Furthermore, students will explore topics related to environmental ethics and apply principles of sustainability to issues impacting natural resources and biodiversity. Finally, this course will provide a holistic approach in learning about environmental problems and rehabilitation through individual and group behavioral changes and environmental regulations.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    SCI203 Environmental Science and Sustainability - Laboratory Course

    This course is a hands-on learning experience that complements the Environmental Science and Sustainability Course. Labs include both problem-based activities and critical-thinking projects and are designed to help students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the complex issues that comprise the field of Environmental Science and Sustainability.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    1.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

    UNIV104 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students acquire effective tools and develop skills necessary for academic success; integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    CE242 Computer Architecture

    This course studies computer organization and design. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, memory system organization and architecture, computer interfacing and multiprocessing.

    Prerequisites

    Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

    This course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a computer programming language. Solutions will be implemented using the essential elements of a modern programming language. Students will also be introduced to the techniques of designing and documenting a problem solution.

    Prerequisites

    MATH103 or MATH112 or MATH143 or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS107 Problem Solving Concepts with Python

    This course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a computer programming language. Solutions will be implemented in the modern programming language Python. Students will be introduced to the techniques of designing and documenting a problem solution.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS115 Programming With C++

    Students are introduced to the C++ programming language in this course. The course includes the basic concepts of both the structured programming and object-oriented programming models. Emphasis is on applying sound software engineering principles. Basic declarations and statements, control structures, data and program design, arrays, text strings, pointers, abstraction, classes and objects are covered. Students are required to complete several programs.

    Prerequisites

    CS104 or Approval; MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH112

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS116 C# Programming

    This course introduces computer programming using the C# programming language. The basic concepts of object-oriented programming are discussed. Topics studied will include an introduction to managed (programming) languages, the Microsoft Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment (IDE), program control structures, data and program design, objects and classes, methods, arrays and object-based applications. Students will complete several C# programs while completing this course. The course will also prepare students to take CS216: Intermediate C# Programming.

    Prerequisites

    CS104MATH103 or MATH143 or MATH112

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    CS117 Programming in Python

    An introduction to the Python programming language -- an interpreted, high-level, dynamic-typed programming language. Python supports the creation of program Scripts and Programs in the three most prominent programming models; namely, Algorithmic/Structured programming, Object-Oriented programming, and Functional programming. This course emphasizes the algorithmic and object-oriented script programming concepts and features of Python. A major emphasis is on the built-in simple and composite data types provided in Python. It also emphasizes the use of Python in developing programs/scripts for fast turnaround solutions for processing both structured and non-structured data. Students are required to complete several scripting/program-related projects.

    Prerequisites

    CS104MATH112 or   MATH106  or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    CS146 Introduction to UNIX

    This course introduces the UNIX operating system and examines its basic features. Students learn common UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, UNIX editors, and the UNIX shells and are introduced to shell script programming. The course requires the preparation of several exercises using the UNIX environment.

    Prerequisites

    CS104 or IT106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

    This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in CS115. The focus is on the more powerful features of C++ including I/O formatting, file I/O, overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, templates and exceptions. A major emphasis is on object-oriented program design, construction and test. Students are required to complete numerous programs using these advanced features.

    Prerequisites

    CS115

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS216 Intermediate C# Programming

    This course builds on the foundation established in CS116. More attention is given to C#’s object-oriented features of inheritance and polymorphism, graphical user interfaces, basic generic collection data structures, overloaded operators, multithreading, exceptions, files and streams.

    Prerequisites

    CS116

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    CS217 Intermediate Python Programming

    This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in CS117. The focus is on the more powerful features of Python including, I/O formatting; file I/O; handling run-time errors; advanced data structures; inheritance; polymorphism; packages; graphical user interfaces (GUIs). A major emphasis is on object-oriented program design, construction and test. Students are required to complete numerous Python script programs using these more advanced features both individually and together.

    Prerequisites

    CS117

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS230 Data Structures

    In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs.

    Prerequisites

    IT152

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS250 Fundamentals of Database Systems

    This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases.

    Prerequisites

    CS104 or  CS106 or   CS107 or   IT110 or  IT140

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS265 Algorithms

    Students are introduced to the basic concepts of algorithm design analysis, including searching and sorting, hashing and information retrieval. Average and asymptotic behaviors are discussed. Complexity issues are explored.

    Prerequisites

    CS230 or   CS235;   MATH200 or   MATH203

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS340 Operating Systems

    In this course, analysis of the design of modern operating systems is emphasized. The topics covered include basic capabilities of multi-program operating systems, virtual memory, resource allocation and management, concurrent processes and threads, protection, file systems, batch and interactive subsystems. Completion of the course requires the student to perform several lab exercises that investigate and exercise key operating system features.

    Prerequisites

    CE242; CS215 or CS216 or IT215 or IT252

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS310 Programming Mobile Apps

    This course addresses the commonalties and differences between the development process and workflow, application design methodology and principles, as well as the implementation tools for mobile computing as contrasted with those for desktop computing. A project that considers the development processes and constraints of mobile computing will be undertaken. Each student builds a solution to a problem involving mobile computing, which is then presented to the simulated concerned stakeholders.

    Prerequisites

    CS215CS216CS217, or  IT215

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS366 Software Engineering Methods

    Software Engineering Methods introduces students to the basic concepts of software engineering including lifecycles, methodologies, techniques, and tools. This course provides an overview of requirements engineering, software design, implementation, testing, and the maintenance of software development products.

    Prerequisites

    CS215 or IT215 or EBUS215 or CS216 or IT152

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE410 Software Processes

    This course gives the student an overview of the software process using the most common development methodologies currently used in industry. Students are introduced to IEEE standards for software processes. The relationship between software quality and process is emphasized with the benefits of process improvement.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS377 Object Oriented Methods

    Object Oriented Methods introduces the student to the basic concepts of object-oriented analysis and design. Use case modeling, class modeling and state modeling using common notations are covered. Completion of several exercises and a final project are required.

    Prerequisites

    IT152

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS381 Software Requirements Engineering

    Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, software analysis, and the specification of software requirements. The additional topics covered during this course include requirements traceability, software quality, and use case scenario development.

    Prerequisites

    CS377 or CS376 or  CS366 or CS475

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS382 Software Design

    Software Design defines and describes the behavior of the software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course.

    Prerequisites

    CS366 or CS475 or  SWE410 or CS376 or  CS377 or CS376

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS383 Software Testing

    Software Testing provides an overview of a variety of testing practices and methods. It gives students the opportunity to apply the theory as they perform software tests. This course explores a variety of tests, including unit testing, usability testing, operational testing, integration testing, and system testing.

    Prerequisites

    CS377 or CS376 or  CS366 or CS475

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    CS481 Computer Science Project I

    Software Engineering Capstone I is the first course in a two-course sequence that involves the development of a software product. Working in teams, students design and develop a software system based on user requirements. This course reinforces the principles of requirements engineering and software design. It includes the analysis and design of a software product.

    Prerequisites

    Senior Status or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    CS482 Software Engineering Capstone II

    Software Engineering Capstone II continues the software product development that began in CS481. Working in teams, students use their requirement and design specifications to develop and test a software product. This course requires the development and test of a software product.

    Prerequisites

    CS481

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    Not available online.
    ×

    EM200 Introduction to Website Development

    Web development is a broad field and this class provides a basic foundation for follow-on web related classes. The focus for this class is to produce and manipulate actual code creation with HTML5 and CSS3 (or updated industry web standards) for structuring/presenting content on the web. W3C provides industry guidelines related to current web design practices and standards. Students employ, interpret, manipulate and generate HTML5 and CSS3 code using Notepad++ or TextWrangler (Mac platform) or other industry standard text editor. Students will learn the history of the Internet, the various iterations of HTML web mark-up language to the current version, HTML5. The use of Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Language for formatting web content will be emphasized. The creation of complete one or more web sites to utilizing the variety of web element will be required.

    Prerequisites

    IT106 or approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

    This course serves as an introduction for students to acquire a foundation in current data communication and networking technologies. The course provides an introduction to the hardware, media, Ethernet, addressing, IP Configuration, components, and connections of a network. Network concepts such as network topologies, and major protocols, as well as the basic functions of network administration and operation are covered.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT300 Computer Networks and Communications

    The Computer Networks and Communications course reinforces the network objectives identified in IT200, IT205 , IT242 or IT245 and extends the understanding to business and commercial networking. By presenting concepts of data communications and network design within the wide area networking arena students understand the operation of telecommunication systems, transmission media and communications hardware, network topologies, switching methods and protocols, security and existing network analysis. The course requires the completion of a research project.

    Prerequisites

    IT200 or   IT205 or IT242 or   IT245 or IT103

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology

    Notes

    This course is no longer offered.
    ×

    MATH304 Linear Algebra

    This course is an introductory course in linear algebra that balances computation and theory. Topics include the solution of systems of linear equations using Gaussian and Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices and determinants. Other topics covered are vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Also introduced is the Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization process, and Least Squares and Fourier approximations. The course is divided between lecture and hands on work in a computer lab using a symbolic math software package.

    Prerequisites

    MATH201 or MATH205

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
    ×

    PM220 Project Management Tools

    This course emphasizes a step-by-step hands-on approach by using automated project tools such as Microsoft Office Project to help effectively plan, analyze, estimate, manage, and control the resources, schedule, and costs of the project.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×
  • Career Paths

    If you want to achieve more in your career, you have to own every opportunity— starting with the right bachelor’s degree. Potential career paths for those who earn a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree include:2

    • Systems Engineer
    • Applications Engineer
    • Network Engineer
    • Software Engineer
    • Software Developer
    • Security Engineer
    • Web Developer
    Headset icon Request more information now
  • Alumni Experience

    Starting in 2012, CTU began a longitudinal study of the impact of higher education on its graduates’ career progression. Each year the study surveys alumni who graduated from CTU one, three, five, and ten years prior. The results are specific to each degree. Below are areas the alumni were asked about. 3

    Satisfaction with Colorado Technical University Rating (%)*
    Satisfaction with experience at CTU
    86%
    Likely to recommend CTU to a friend or colleague
    84%
    Instructors appeared knowledgeable in their subject matter
    92%
    CTU’s program prepared me to pursue a career in my field
    77%
    My education has helped me advance my career
    63%
    Satisfaction with Colorado Technical University Rating (%)*
    Engage in creative problem solving
    79%
    Understand all sides of an issue or challenge
    83%
    Team up with co-workers to solve issues and challenges
    80%
    Communicate effectively with co-workers
    81%
    Communicate effectively with my manager
    82%

    *Percentage of respondents who agreed that CTU equipped them for skill or competency

    Headset icon Contact an Admissions Advisor for additional information
  • Employer Experience

    Since 2010, CTU has measured the experience of employers with recent CTU graduates on their staff to better understand how to deliver a curriculum to students that provide the broadest opportunities for career growth. The results are specific to each degree. Below are areas employees were asked about in regards to their CTU Alumni employees.4,5

    Employer Experience Rating (%)*
    Likelihood that an employer of a CTU grad would hire another
    83%
    CTU graduates performed as well or better than other employees
    100%
    CTU graduates prepared as well or better than other employees to work at their job6
    100%
    Employers' Ranking of CTU Graduates' Skills & Competencies Rating (%)*
    Analyze data effectively
    87%
    Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills on the job
    88%
    Can be trusted to communicate appropriately with senior leadership at organization6
    87%
    Can be trusted to write a report (or other communication) without managerial editorial input
    85%
    Demonstrate understanding of communications written to them
    90%
    Are able to negotiate compromises
    89%
    Take direction well
    88%
    Work effectively in a team environment
    87%
    Coordinate team projects effectively
    84%
    Manage conflicts effectively
    83%
    Provide input on planning for business
    86%
    Take initiative to lead projects6
    84%
    Think about how their projects will impact the business6
    83%

    *Percentage of respondents who agreed or strongly agreed

    Headset icon Contact an Admissions Advisor for additional information

Gainful Employment and Other Student Disclosures

Below you can find placement rates and other information tailored to your chosen campus and program. Certain disclosures are published on this website to assist students in understanding the facts about their programs.

Program Disclosure Information for:
-- Select Campus above --

 

Employment Rates:

Select a campus for rate information.

 

- Graduation Rate

Select a campus for rate information.

Learn More 

Need help choosing the right degree program?

Request Information Chat Now

1Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Computer Systems Analysts, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm (visited February 26, 2013).

2http://burning-glass.com/job-market-data/; The career titles are provided by Burning Glass. These results are based upon an analysis of over 7 million current job listings compiled from over 17,000 sources – the world’s most comprehensive repository of job openings. Students who earn this degree should not view this list as exhaustive and are not limited to only these options post-graduation. Some career titles listed above may not be entry-level and may require further education or job experience.

3Alumni Survey - 2012 CTU Alumni Career Progression Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in 2011.

4Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in designated years between 2002 and 2011.

5Employer Survey - 2011 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2010 CTU graduates.

6Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2011 CTU graduates.

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