Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering degree is designed to help graduates prepare for the newest and most exciting developments in the field. Computer engineers are not only involved in the design of the computer hardware essential to today’s businesses, but they may also be called on to develop software, program microprocessors or design wired or wireless networks.

  •  Classes start August 16, 2015

  • Checkmark iconTotal Credits190.5

  • Program Availability

Program Details
  • Courses
  • Curriculum
  • Related Degrees
  • Tuition
  • Career Paths
Degree Requirements
Courses: Preparatory
CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

4

MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

4.5

MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry

4.5

MATH116 Foundations for Calculus

4.5

Courses: General Education
CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry

5

ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

4.5

ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

4.5

ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

4.5

COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

4.5

HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

4.5

UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

4.5

or
HUMNELE Humanities Elective

4.5

MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

4.5

MATH205 Differential Calculus

5

MATH207 Integral Calculus

5

MATH304 Linear Algebra

4

PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age

4.5

PHY211 Physics I - Mechanics

5

PHY212 Physics II – Heat, Light and Sound

5

PSYC102 Introductory Psychology

4.5

or
SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

4.5

General Education Credit Hours: 69.5
CE242 Computer Architecture

4

CE412 Advanced Computer Architecture

4

CS115 Programming With C++

4

CS146 Introduction to UNIX

4

CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

4

CS230 Data Structures

4

CS340 Operating Systems

4

CS366 Software Engineering Methods

4

CS376 Object Oriented Methods

4

EE110 Introduction to Engineering

4

EE221 Circuit Analysis I

5

EE252 Digital Design I

5

EE312 Embedded Microcontrollers

5

EE325 CMOS Design

5

EE331 Circuit Analysis II

5

EE341 Advanced Circuit Analysis

5

EE352 Digital Design II

5

EE375 Electronic Design I

5

EE472 Advanced Digital System Design

4

EE486 Impact of Global Issues on Design

2

EE490 Product Design I

4

EE491 Product Design II

4

EM200 Introduction to Website Development

4

IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

4

MATH302 Differential Equations

5

MATH366 Probability and Statistics

5

PM220 Project Management Tools

4

PHY350 Solid State Physics

5

Core Credit Hours: 121
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 190.5
The BSCE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone: (410) 347-7700.

CS104 Problem Solving Concepts With C++

This course covers the fundamental problem solving approaches that lead to solutions suitable for implementation with a computer programming language. Solutions will be implemented using the essential elements of a modern programming language. Students will also be introduced to the techniques of designing and documenting a problem solution.

Prerequisites

MATH103  or MATH112  or MATH143  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

MATH112 begins with a complete review of elementary algebra. It continues with simplifying rational and radical expressions. Functions are introduced, including their definition, general properties of zeroes, extreme values, symmetry, transformations, and graphs. Special attention is given to linear, rational, radical, and quadratic equations. Additional topics include computation with complex numbers and solving systems of linear equations with matrices and determinants. a graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH109  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH114 Analytic Trigonometry

MATH114 is a college-level course on trigonometry. The six trigonometric functions are studied from both a right triangle and unit circle approach. Applications are stressed, using graphs, triangles, and trigonometric identities. Computations with complex numbers in polar form, and vectors in the plane are introduced. Along with MATH116, this course prepares students for Calculus. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH112  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH116 Foundations for Calculus

Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied in detail. The concept of a composite and inverse function is explored. Other topics covered include: polynomial division, partial fractions, conic sections, sequences, series, and parametric equations. Along with MATH114, this course prepares students for Calculus. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH112  or Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

CHE105 Introduction to Chemistry

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding types, reactions, equation and stoichiometry (a mathematical approach to solving problems involving chemical phenomena).

Prerequisites

MATH103  or MATH1135 or MATH112

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Engineering
×

ECON210 Principles of Macroeconomics

Knowing how the economy actually operates is critical for success in any career and as an educated person. Every day, the "economy" is in the news, governing what happens in politics, in the workplace and in the quality of individual lives. This course will address the dynamics of how our economy works (or does not work.) The study of the basic institutions, terminology and theory of the main economic activities of production, distribution and consumption, especially as they apply to the operation of our national economy. Topics include savings and investment, national output, expenditure and income, real versus potential GDP, aggregate demand and supply and fiscal and monetary policy. Students will learn the impact of the economy on different economic sectors that affect their career paths.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

This course addresses how to write to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for writing assignments. The course begins with an introduction of the writing process and gives students the opportunity to practice writing in different modes. Students learn to develop their grammar and writing concepts to enable them to write effectively both in academic and professional contexts. . This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each other’s' work.
This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. In both Composition courses, Research Skills/ Information Literacy workshops will introduce students to the critical 21st century skill of research: how to use dictionaries and other reference books and how to access online databases of the CTU library for academic and professional inquiry.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

This course builds upon ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating college level research skills and writing essays that convey information, make a point, or provide an opinion. Students study the APA Handbook, learn about plagiarism, and conduct research, accurately citing CTU resources. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice critically reading and evaluating texts. This is a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others’ work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical thinking and reading skills. Research/Information Literacy Skills: The Information Literacy workshops challenge students to use the library’s resources to find credible resources, , and allow them to learning about important writing and research skills such as evaluating and summarizing information from sources.

Prerequisites

ENGL101  or ENGL111  or ENGL125

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

This course covers technical and professional writing. Students review and prepare a wide variety of documents including abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Special attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a document.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

HIST101 Modern American History: 1950 to the 21st Century

Today's news is tomorrow’s history, a maxim that strikes at the heart of our historical experience and how it affects current events. This course focuses on the key people, social experiments and technologies that continue to impact our lives. Particular attention is paid to the latter half of the 20th Century and the dawn of a new millennium in America – a time that, through the lens of history, both gives us pause and inspires hope for the future.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

UNIV104 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students acquire effective tools and develop skills necessary for academic success; integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH203 Applications of Discrete Mathematics

This course studies problems that involve finite or discrete data sets. Logic and set notation form a foundation for creating structure in data storage and information retrieval. Tools used include truth tables, methods of proof, Venn diagrams, Big-Oh functions, graphs, trees, paths, and matrices. Additional topics include defining formal languages and recognizing syntactically correct sentences. Additional techniques include automata, digraphs, state transition tables and context free grammars.

Prerequisites

MATH112  or MATH110

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

MATH205 Differential Calculus

MATH 205 begins with the concept of limits, including one-sided and limits involving infinity, and relates limits to the concept of continuity. The tangent line to a graph at a point leads to the definition of derivative and the rules of differentiation for both explicit and implicit functions, including polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Applications of the derivative include related rates, curve sketching, optimization problems and l’Hôpital’s Rule. Basic rules for integration are introduced, including the method of substitution. The definite integral is then applied to finding the area under and between curves. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH114  or MATH116

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

MATH207 Integral Calculus

The study of calculus is continued with the differentiation and integration of transcendental functions (exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric, and hyperbolic). Applications of the definite integral include finding volumes of solids of revolution by the disk and shell methods, and the length of plane curves and surfaces of revolution. Integration techniques include integration by parts, partial fractions, trigonometric substitution, and use of tables and technology. Additional topics covered include improper integrals, and Taylor polynomials. The course concludes with an introduction to multivariable functions, partial derivatives, and double and triple integrals. A graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

Prerequisites

MATH205

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

MATH304 Linear Algebra

This course is an introductory course in linear algebra that balances computation and theory. Topics include the solution of systems of linear equations using Gaussian and Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices and determinants. Other topics covered are vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Also introduced is the Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization process, and Least Squares and Fourier approximations. The course is divided between lecture and hands on work in a computer lab using a symbolic math software package.

Prerequisites

MATH201  or MATH205

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

PHIL306 Ethics for the Information Age

This course provides students with an introduction to technical issues related to ethics and their chosen career field, and includes an awareness of the impact of design decisions in a diverse global environment.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

PHY211 Physics I - Mechanics

This is a calculus-based physics course for the scientist or engineer. Topics include linear and angular motion, forces, momentum, work, energy, periodic motion and properties of materials.

Prerequisites

MATH202  or MATH207

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

PHY212 Physics II – Heat, Light and Sound

This is a calculus-based physics course for the scientist or engineer. Topics include wave motion, sound, heat, thermodynamics, light, optics, and an introduction to the special theory of relativity.

Prerequisites

PHY211

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

PSYC102 Introductory Psychology

Psychology is fundamental to every field in academic study. This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of human behavior as well as emotional and cognitive development. Emphasis is on the self, providing a personal frame of reference for developing an understanding of human thoughts, emotions, and actions. Coursework emphasizes terminology, principles, and theories that comprise modern concepts of introductory psychology. Discussions and class projects encourage critical thinking into normal and abnormal human behavior. Students achieve a stronger synthesis of information through the study of practical, real-world application of course concepts within their professional, personal, and relational lives.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

This introductory course brings perspectives of the social sciences to bear on understanding group behavior. The course examines society using theoretical and methodological principles and applications that distinguish sociology from other social sciences. Learners gain insight into unique aspects of cultural and social interaction across the globe, while examining negative aspects of social control, deviance and crime, and authority. Information presented explains how culture, values, roles, norms, social interaction, and social stratification influence everyday life through careers, community, and family.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4.5

Distribution

General Education
×

CE242 Computer Architecture

This course studies computer organization and design. Topics include digital logic and digital systems, machine level representation of data, memory system organization and architecture, computer interfacing and multiprocessing.

Prerequisites

Approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CE412 Advanced Computer Architecture

This course covers advanced hardware design techniques and control strategies employed in modern computer systems. Topics include advanced memory design, instructions sets, benchmarking, pipelining, advanced network architectures, and high performance computing.

Prerequisites

EE312  and MATH366  or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS115 Programming With C++

Students are introduced to the C++ programming language in this course. The course includes the basic concepts of both the structured programming and object-oriented programming models. Emphasis is on applying sound software engineering principles. Basic declarations and statements, control structures, data and program design, arrays, text strings, pointers, abstraction, classes and objects are covered. Students are required to complete several programs.

Prerequisites

CS104  or Approval; MATH103  or MATH143  or MATH112

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS146 Introduction to UNIX

This course introduces the UNIX operating system and examines its basic features. Students learn common UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, UNIX editors, and the UNIX shells and are introduced to shell script programming. The course requires the preparation of several exercises using the UNIX environment.

Prerequisites

CS104  or IT106

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS215 Intermediate C++ Programming

This course builds upon the fundamental topics covered in CS115. The focus is on the more powerful features of C++ including I/O formatting, file I/O, overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, templates and exceptions. A major emphasis is on object-oriented program design, construction and test. Students are required to complete numerous programs using these advanced features.

Prerequisites

CS115

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS230 Data Structures

In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs.

Prerequisites

IT152

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS340 Operating Systems

In this course, analysis of the design of modern operating systems is emphasized. The topics covered include basic capabilities of multi-program operating systems, virtual memory, resource allocation and management, concurrent processes and threads, protection, file systems, batch and interactive subsystems. Completion of the course requires the student to perform several lab exercises that investigate and exercise key operating system features.

Prerequisites

CE242; CS215  or CS216  or IT215  or IT252

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

CS366 Software Engineering Methods

Software Engineering Methods introduces students to the basic concepts of software engineering including lifecycles, methodologies, techniques, and tools. This course provides an overview of requirements engineering, software design, implementation, testing, and the maintenance of software development products.

Prerequisites

CS215  or IT215  or EBUS215  or CS216  or IT152

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE110 Introduction to Engineering

This course provides the beginning engineer with fundamental knowledge and skills associated with the electrical or computer engineering professions. It will introduce common electronic components, basic circuit configurations, and laboratory instruments. Bench practices and lab reports will be introduced along with computer aided analysis.

Prerequisites

MATH080

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE252 Digital Design I

EE252 is an introduction to the analysis and design of combinational and sequential digital systems. Number systems, Boolean switching algebra and Karnaugh mapping are presented as basic tools used in the design of digital systems using SSI and MSI level components. Lab activity, using TTL ICs, emphasizes the design and analysis techniques presented in lectures.

Prerequisites

EE110  and CE242

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE312 Embedded Microcontrollers

Embedded microcontroller development processes and tools are introduced. The hardware and software architecture of a contemporary off-the-shelf microcontroller is analyzed to determine its functional role as an embedded controller in the design of a digital system. An assembly language program development and simulation system introduces students to embedded system development environments.

Prerequisites

EE252  or CE242

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE325 CMOS Design

This course introduces the design and performance of complementary MOSFET devices and circuits. Emphasis is on digital circuit performance as it relates to the physical layout of the integrated circuit (IC). Projects include layout of digital circuits, from individual devices to multi-transistor elements, and analysis of the resulting circuit performance. Exercises include computer simulation and system integration as a tool for design. Lab projects provide experience with layout, extraction and analysis of circuits designed to meet given specifications.

Prerequisites

EE375  and EE252

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE331 Circuit Analysis II

This calculus-based course covers circuit analysis related to AC and transient signals. Resistance, reactance and impedance parameters are analyzed in series, parallel and complex circuits. Trigonometrics functions, AC network theorems, transformer and passive filter theories are applied. Laboratory circuit construction, test and measurements are performed using the appropriate components and equipment. Laboratory emphasis is placed on the knowledge and use of test and measurement instruments. Circuit simulation tools used in industry are employed.

Prerequisites

EE221  or EE321; MATH302  or MAT302

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE341 Advanced Circuit Analysis

Introduces Laplace transform and frequency domain methods to model, analyze and design electrical circuits. Additional topics include Bode analysis techniques, Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Methods studied are applied in passive and active filter design.

Prerequisites

EE331

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE352 Digital Design II

A continuation of the study of digital system design emphasizing the use of programmable logic devices and modern design methods. Contemporary logic families are reviewed along with practical design limitations. Computer simulation tools are introduced in the design process.

Prerequisites

EE252

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE375 Electronic Design I

This course provides a foundational knowledge for analyzing and designing electronic circuits as well as an intuitive approach to the design process. Discrete components and circuits are analyzed and designed to develop an understanding of how these components and circuits have lead to the fabrication of integrated circuits (ICs). Computer aided circuit stimulation, as well as hands-on applications of analysis and design theory, validates theoretical concepts.

Prerequisites

EE331

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE472 Advanced Digital System Design

The 47X series of courses are designed to provide Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering major senior-level students with the opportunity to independently solve one or more engineering design problems. A student will be required to define the problem specifications in the form of a project plan that must be approved by the course faculty mentor. The project plan serves as the framework for the student’s efforts to satisfactorily solve the design problem. The resulting design may be in the form of a hardware implementation, computer simulation, or both. A professional final report and briefing are required at the end of the course.

Prerequisites

MATH366  or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE486 Impact of Global Issues on Design

This course explores global, economic, environmental, societal, and political issues that impact problem solutions. Students will be expected to consider the interaction of human issues and technology alternatives when deploying hardware and/or software solutions in differing environments and cultures.

Prerequisites

CS115  or IT115  or CS116; ENGL206/; HIST101; ECON210  or ECON212

Corequisites

None

Credits

2

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE490 Product Design I

This is the first course of a two-course capstone design sequence that integrates students into product design teams comprising engineering, engineering technology and logistics students. Each team is given a conceptual problem to be solved by the creation of a new product. This practicum exposes the team to current product development methods and issues beyond functionality, such as human factors, safety, engineering economics, maintenance and manufacturing. Students completing EE490 are expected to take the follow-on course, EE491 in the next term.

Prerequisites

EE375; EE312; ENGL240  or approval; ENGL210/

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EE491 Product Design II

This is the completion of a two-course series capstone, design sequence. Student enrolled in EE491 are expected to have completed EE490 in the previous term.

Prerequisites

EE490  (The previous term)

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

EM200 Introduction to Website Development

Web development is a broad field and this class provides a basic foundation for follow-on web related classes. The focus for this class is to produce and manipulate actual code creation with HTML5 and CSS3 (or updated industry web standards) for structuring/presenting content on the web. W3C provides industry guidelines related to current web design practices and standards. Students employ, interpret, manipulate and generate HTML5 and CSS3 code using Notepad++ or TextWrangler (Mac platform) or other industry standard text editor. Students will learn the history of the Internet, the various iterations of HTML web mark-up language to the current version, HTML5. The use of Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Language for formatting web content will be emphasized. The creation of complete one or more web sites to utilizing the variety of web element will be required.

Prerequisites

IT106  or approval

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

This course serves as an introduction for students to acquire a foundation in current data communication and networking technologies. The course provides an introduction to the hardware, media, Ethernet, addressing, IP Configuration, components, and connections of a network. Network concepts such as network topologies, and major protocols, as well as the basic functions of network administration and operation are covered.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
×

MATH302 Differential Equations

In this course methods are studies to solve differential equations and then apply them to application problems. Solution methods of specific types of first order differential equations are followed by their application to growth and decay, heating and cooling, and voltage and current response to R-L and R-C circuits. Solution methods for solving higher order linear differential equations are followed by their application to predicting the motion of masses under free and damped conditions. Analogous electronic filter and control circuits are modeled and their time domain behavior is predicted, especially for sinusoidal inputs. The final technique studied is the use of Laplace transforms to solve linear equations, and their application to second order differential equations from simple circuits.

Prerequisites

MATH202  or MATH207  and EE221

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

MATH366 Probability and Statistics

Introduces models used to establish probabilities of basic events and apply them to calculate the probabilities of more complex events. General methods of calculating parameters of discrete and continuous distributions are learned and applied to problems. Several specific discrete and continuous models are studied to recognize their properties and how to apply them.

Prerequisites

MATH202  or MATH207; CS104

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

General Education for Computer Science & Engineering
×

PM220 Project Management Tools

This course emphasizes a step-by-step hands-on approach by using automated project tools such as Microsoft Office Project to help effectively plan, analyze, estimate, manage, and control the resources, schedule, and costs of the project.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None

Credits

4

Distribution

Business
×

PHY350 Solid State Physics

This course provides an introduction to the basic physics and principles of operation of the major semiconductor devices. These devices include the diode, bipolar junction transistor and field effect transistor. All modern electronic circuits are created from combinations of these devices, from the simplest power supply to the most complex integrated circuit microprocessor. The course extends concepts from basic physics to explain carrier motion in these devices under the influence of electric fields and semiconductor properties.

Prerequisites

EE375&nsbp and PHY212

Corequisites

None

Credits

5

Distribution

Business
×

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCE) degree program is designed to prepare graduates to enter one of the newest and most exciting engineering fields. Computer engineers are not only involved in the design of the computer hardware essential to today’s world, they may be called on to develop software, program microprocessors, or design wired or wireless networks. The BSCE program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 – telephone (410)347-7700.

The educational objectives of the BSCE program are to provide graduates with: 1) the discipline and expertise to a sufficient degree to be productive, entry-level computer engineers within the industry; and 2) academic preparation for entry into the Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE) program.

Outcomes:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understanding the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science: The BSCS program contains a set of core courses which are designed to provide an understanding of the varied aspects of technology, operating systems and networking, as well as knowledge of computer system architecture and the software system engineering process.

Contact an admissions advisor at your campus or see our tuition resources page for the cost of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering.

If you want to achieve more in your career, you have to own every opportunity— starting with the right bachelor’s degree. Potential career paths for those who earn a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering degree include:1

  • Engineering Manager
  • Systems Engineer
  • Hardware Engineer
  • Software Engineer
  • Software Developer
  • Test Engineer
  • Applications Engineer
  • Applications Developer
Relevant Institutional/Programmatic Accreditation
CTU is institutionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission
CTU’s Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering program at the CTU Colorado Springs campus is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

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Below you can find placement rates and other information tailored to your chosen campus and program. Certain disclosures are published on this website to assist students in understanding the facts about their programs.

Program Disclosure Information for:
Colorado Springs - Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

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Colorado Springs - Graduation Rate

The percentage of first-time, full-time undergraduate students who started between
7/1/2008 and 10/15/2008 who completed within 150% of the normal time period: 27%

This Graduation Rate includes both Colorado Springs and Pueblo campus locations.

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Graduation Rate

A first-time student has no prior postsecondary experience before enrolling at this campus. This means that a student who attended another college, university or other postsecondary school before enrolling at this school is not included in the calculation. The rate also does not include students initially enrolled part-time, taking individual classes (as compared to enrolling in a full program), or only auditing classes. These rates are calculated using the Student Right-to-Know formula in order to comply with U.S. Department of Education requirements. The statistics track all first-time, full-time and certificate or degree-seeking undergraduate students who began school during the date range and have completed within 150% of the normal program length. For example, for a two-year program, the graduation rate would include students who had completed within three years of beginning the program. This statistic is not specific to one program alone; rather, all applicable undergraduate programs are included in this overall rate. Information pertaining to the Graduation Rates of all postsecondary institutions recognized by the U.S. Department of Education may be found on the College Navigator website. http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/

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1http://www.burning-glass.com/realtime; The career titles are provided by Burning Glass. These results are based upon an analysis of over 7 million current job listings compiled from over 17,000 sources – the world’s most comprehensive repository of job openings. Students who earn this degree should not view this list as exhaustive and are not limited to only these options post-graduation. Some career titles listed above may not be entry-level and may require further education or job experience.

2Alumni Survey - 2012 CTU Alumni Career Progression Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in designated years between 2002 and 2011.

3Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of CTU alumni who graduated in designated years between 2002 and 2011.

4Employer Survey - 2011 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2010 CTU graduates.

5Employer Survey - 2012 CTU Employer Experience Research: Survey of 2011 CTU graduates.

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