Bachelor of Science in Information Technology - Software Systems Engineering

Students enrolled at Colorado Technical University can earn a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree with Software Systems Engineering specialization. In fact, a variety of IT specializations are available through the program, but the Software Systems Engineering specialization specifically enables students to learn about software design and development, database systems, and at least one programming language. Offered on campus in Colorado or online, the BSIT degree program builds from general education requirements to IT coursework to the Software Systems Engineering specialization coursework.

Relevant Institutional/Programmatic Accreditation
CTU is institutionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission www.hlcomission.org

  • Classes start

  • Total Credits 

    184
  • Program Availability

    Online | Colorado Springs | Denver

Program Details

Program Outline
Courses
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  • Program Outline

    Standards Behind the CTU Software Engineering Degree

    Because CTU instructors want to provide an education that is both high quality and relevant, the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) degree was created using the industrial standards from the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon. Additionally, central security service (CSS)-related programming was included as part of the software developer degree aligned with knowledge units used by the National Security Agency Centers of Academic Excellence.

    The importance of these standards will become clear as students complete their software developer degree . CTU’s BSIT degree includes general education courses, core classes, and courses focused on the concentration specialization.

    A Closer Look at the CTU Degree

    General education. Students enrolled in the BSIT program at CTU complete 66 quarter credits hours in general education, which fall into categories such as math, sociology, science, and writing. Several elective options, including in the humanities and U.S. history or government, are also included to enable students to maintain a breadth of knowledge.

    Core education and specialization. The core education of the software developer degree program comprises 54 quarter credits, including coursework in spreadsheet applications, networking fundamentals, and the Unix operating system. Students then follow this with 64 quarter credits in their specialization area of software systems engineering that includes eight quarter credit hours in one of the following programming languages:

    • JAVA
    • C#
    • Visual Basic

    Two capstone courses help round out a student's education, giving them the opportunity to design and test a software product as a team.

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  • Courses

    Degree Requirements
    Courses: General Education
    COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

    4.5

    ELEELEHUMN Humanities Elective

    4.5

    ELEELESCI Science Elective

    4.5

    ELEELESCI1 Science Elective 1

    4.5

    ELEELESCILAB Science Lab Elective

    1.5

    ELEELESCILAB1 Science Lab Elective 1

    1.5

    ELEELESOC Social Science Elective

    4.5

    ELEELEUS US History/US Government Elective

    4.5

    ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

    4.5

    ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

    4.5

    MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

    4.5

    MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

    4.5

    MATH225 Applications of Discrete Mathematics and Statistics

    4.5

    PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

    4.5

    SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

    4.5

    UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

    4.5

    or
    HUMELE Humanities Elective

    4.5

    General Education Credit Hours: 66
    Courses: Core
    CS126 Unix Fundamentals

    4

    CS251 Fundamentals of Database Systems

    4

    CS362 Structured Query Language for Data Management

    4

    CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security

    4

    EM200 Introduction to Website Development

    4

    IT106 Introduction to Programming Logic

    4

    IT140 Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments

    4

    or
    ITELE IT Elective

    4

    IT190 Introduction to IT

    4

    IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

    4

    IT254 Spreadsheet Applications

    4

    IT401 Information Technology Architectures

    4

    IT425 Systems Analysis, Design and Integration

    4

    MPM210 Introduction to Project Management

    6

    Core Courses Credit Hours: 54
    Courses: Specialization
    CS230 Data Structures

    4

    CS346 User Interface Design

    4

    CS377 Object Oriented Methods

    4

    CS455 Software Requirements Engineering

    4

    CS457 Software Design

    4

    CS459 Software Testing

    4

    IT151 Introduction to Java Programming I

    4

    IT152 Introduction to Java Programming II

    4

    MPM344 Project Risk Management

    4

    or
    ITELE IT Elective

    4

    MPM357 Project Performance and Quality Assurance

    4

    or
    ITELE IT Elective

    4

    SWE311 The Software Engineering Profession

    4

    SWE410 Software Processes

    4

    SWE440 Software Project Management

    4

    SWE441 Human Elements in Projects and Organizations

    4

    SWE481 Software Engineering Capstone I

    4

    SWE482 Software Engineering Capstone II

    4

    Specialization Credit Hours: 64
    Students choosing a Project Management focus will take the courses listed below in the Project Management track in place of CS346, CS377, SWE441, SWE481, SWE482
    MPM332 Organizational Leadership

    4

    MPM346 Contracts and Procurement

    4

    MPM434 Project Scheduling and Cost

    6

    MPM468 HR Project Management

    6

    TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 184
    *Courses shown are applicable for the online degree. Courses may differ when pursued at a campus.

    COMS201 Technical and Professional Writing

    This course covers technical and professional writing. Students review and prepare a wide variety of documents including abstracts and/or executive summaries, mechanism and process descriptions, instructions, proposals, requirement specifications, test plans and procedures, and technical datasheets. Special attention is given to adapting writing style to a particular audience, adjusting document mechanics and semantics for a specific purpose, formatting design elements in a consistent manner, and integrating graphics into a

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking

    This course addresses how to write to make a point; how to use good grammar, vocabulary and logical thinking; as well as how to find a suitable topic for writing assignments. The course begins with an introduction of the writing process and gives students the opportunity to practice writing in different modes. Students learn to develop their grammar and writing concepts to enable them to write effectively both in academic and professional contexts. . This workshop course is highly experiential, supportive, and collaborative, as students read and critique each other’s' work.
    This is the first in a sequence on Composition and Writing skills. Our view of the required composition sequence is that it is essential for all who want to become skilled critical thinkers and educated people. In both Composition courses, Research Skills/ Information Literacy workshops will introduce students to the critical 21st century skill of research: how to use dictionaries and other reference books and how to access online databases of the CTU library for academic and professional inquiry.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    ENGL103 Composition: Writing and Research

    This course builds upon ENGL101 Composition and Critical Thinking. Students practice drafting progressively complex papers, demonstrating college level research skills and writing essays that convey information, make a point, or provide an opinion. Students study the APA Handbook, learn about plagiarism, and conduct research, accurately citing CTU resources. In addition, this course uses readings to demonstrate excellence and eloquence in speaking and writing, emphasizing the crucial synergy between learning to write and developing the practice critically reading and evaluating texts. This is a highly collaborative course, with students reading and critiquing others’ work, as a means to create a learning community as well as develop critical thinking and reading skills. Research/Information Literacy Skills: The Information Literacy workshops challenge students to use the library’s resources to find credible resources and allow them to learning about important writing and research skills such as evaluating and summarizing information from sources.

    Prerequisites

    ENGL101 or ENGL111 or ENGL125

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH109 Introduction to Algebra

    MATH109 begins with a review of arithmetic operations on signed numbers and fractions. Students are introduced to the idea of using symbols for numbers and to basic transformations of algebraic expressions. The skills of expanding, factoring, and simplifying algebraic expressions are applied to the solving of linear and simple quadratic equations. Linear relationships between real life quantities are studied, both from the graphical and the algebraic point of view. Elementary rules for exponents, simple roots and basic operations on rational expressions are used to simplify expressions. The course ends with an introduction to solving quadratic equations by factoring and by quadratic formula.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH112 Analytic College Algebra

    MATH112 begins with a complete review of elementary algebra. It continues with simplifying rational and radical expressions. Functions are introduced, including their definition, general properties of zeroes, extreme values, symmetry, transformations, and graphs. Special attention is given to linear, rational, radical, and quadratic equations. Additional topics include computation with complex numbers and solving systems of linear equations with matrices and determinants. a graphing calculator or equivalent technology is required.

    Prerequisites

    Math109, or approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    MATH225 Applications of Discrete Mathematics and Statistics

    This course studies problems that involve finite or discrete data sets. Logic and set notation form a foundation for creating structure in data storage and information retrieval. Tools used include truth tables, methods of proof, Venn diagrams, Big-Oh functions, graphs, trees, paths, and matrices. In addition, the course covers statistical measures, basic probability concepts, and normal distributions.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    PHIL101 Introduction to Ethics

    This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of moral and ethical theories and concepts. The coursework and course discussions will encourage students to solve ethical dilemmas by identifying and applying moral and ethical theories. Moreover, students will be encouraged to explain their reasoning from cultural, professional, and personal standpoints. Ethical theories covered will include virtue ethics, deontology (Kant’s theory), utilitarianism and social contract theory.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    SOCL102 Introductory Sociology

    This introductory course brings perspectives of the social sciences to bear on understanding group behavior. The course examines society using theoretical and methodological principles and applications that distinguish sociology from other social sciences. Learners gain insight into unique aspects of cultural and social interaction across the globe, while examining negative aspects of social control, deviance and crime, and authority. Information presented explains how culture, values, roles, norms, social interaction, and social stratification influence everyday life through careers, community, and family.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    UNIV104 Academic and Career Success

    UNIV104 provides students with an introduction to student success, technology, and career planning strategies. Students acquire effective tools and develop skills necessary for academic success; integrating them with career planning strategies to develop an individual Success Strategy Plan.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4.5

    Distribution

    General Education
    ×

    CS126 Unix Fundamentals

    In this course, students explore end user interaction with the UNIX operating system. This course examines the basic features of the UNIX operating system, UNIX commands, the UNIX file system, the UNIX shells, and shell programming. It also draws comparisons between UNIX and Linux.

    Prerequisites

    IT106  or CS104

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS251 Fundamentals of Database Systems

    This course introduces database design, and implementation and database management systems. Topics covered in this course include conceptual and logical database designs for several businesses, implementing these designs using a database management system and developing business applications that access these databases.

    Prerequisites

     or approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS362 Structured Query Language for Data Management

    This course gives complete coverage of SQL, with an emphasis on storage, retrieval and manipulation of data.

    Prerequisites

    CS250  or CS251

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CSS150 Introduction to Computer Security

    This course provides the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the ten domains comprising the Information Security Common Body of Knowledge. Topics include access control systems, telecommunications and network security, cryptography, operations security and business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Students will be exposed to security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, investigations and ethics.

    Prerequisites

    IT204

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    EM200 Introduction to Website Development

    Web development is a broad field and this class provides a basic foundation for follow-on web related classes. The focus for this class is to produce and manipulate actual code creation with HTML5 and CSS3 (or updated industry web standards) for structuring/presenting content on the web. W3C provides industry guidelines related to current web design practices and standards. Students employ, interpret, manipulate and generate HTML5 and CSS3 code using Notepad++ or TextWrangler (Mac platform) or other industry standard text editor. Students will learn the history of the Internet, the various iterations of HTML web mark-up language to the current version, HTML5. The use of Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Language for formatting web content will be emphasized. The creation of complete one or more web sites to utilizing the variety of web element will be required.

    Prerequisites

    IT106  or approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT106 Introduction to Programming Logic

    This course is the study of programming logic and the application of this logic to problem solving. In the course we will discuss and apply many approaches to problem solving such as step algorithms, flow charts, truth tables, and pseudo-code. Students will learn techniques to translate real life problems into forms that will enable computer programs to solve them. Students will learn and apply programming language constructs (i.e. linear, branching, iteration, subroutines, etc.) using a visual tool. These techniques and tools should allow students to create and design programming logic that will become a foundational skill for future programming courses.

    Prerequisites

    MATH112  or MATH106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT140 Introduction to Operating Systems and Client/Server Environments

    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of operating systems and specialized networking operating system models. The fundamentals of common operating systems, client/server environments, network infrastructure, theoretic models and system architecture are discussed, including legacy operating system platforms and security processes utilized in today's enterprises.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT190 Introduction to IT

    Introduction to IT provides an overview of issues and opportunities presented by the fast-paced world of information technology. Students receive an overview of computer-based systems and learn about the development operation and management of these systems. The course includes basic hardware and software principles and current information systems. Topics include databases and networking and their critical organizational importance, IT systems development, the impact of the Internet on organizations, and emerging technologies and trends for the future.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT204 Fundamentals of Networking

    This course serves as an introduction for students to acquire a foundation in current data communication and networking technologies. The course provides an introduction to the hardware, media, Ethernet, addressing, IP Configuration, components, and connections of a network. Network concepts such as network topologies, and major protocols, as well as the basic functions of network administration and operation are covered.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT254 Spreadsheet Applications

    In today's dynamic and complex business environment, the ability to understand matrix thinking and manipulate data on an Excel spreadsheet are taken for granted as a condition of success. Electronic spreasheets are used in a variety of business calculations to analyze, graph, and manage data. Applications of spreadsheets can be used to generate reports to maintain large amounts of data, make accurate calculations, and accelerate repetitive tasks. This course is designed to introduce the basic computer spreadsheet application skills, with an emphasis on essential design, format, functions, and formulas of spreadsheet operations in solving real-world problems.

    Prerequisites

    MAT143 or MATH143  or MATH140 OR MATH140-L or MAT150 or MATH150  or MATH105 or MATH102  or MATH106  or MATH112

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT401 Information Technology Architectures

    The major objective of this course is to introduce the concepts, methodology and terminology of Distributed Systems Architecture within the context of Enterprise Technical Architecture and integrate this knowledge with previous courses in operating systems, database management systems, networking, programming and program management. The course primarily focuses on the overall planning process of Enterprise Technical Architecture. Issues and options involved in implementing Enterprise Technical Architecture and incorporating a distributed IT system are examined from a Macro Level. This class addresses how the emergent profession of Enterprise Technical Architecture fits into the duties and responsibilities of today's IT manager. Other resources and references relating to the field of enterprise architecture and broader technical definition of the organization which includes the Technical Architecture are introduced.

    Prerequisites

    IT204  or approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT425 Systems Analysis, Design and Integration

    Systems Analysis and Design provides instruction on the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) phases. This course looks at the SDLC as a structured approach for developing requirements, performing analysis, producing the design, coding or installation of the solution, testing the application and installing the final product. The system as defined in this course could include a network, telecommunications, new software development or other information systems. It also explores the business and technical decision making process for "buy versus build," in-sourcing versus outsourcing, evaluation and benchmarking and testing. , , System Integration and organization deployment focus on the technical and cultural integration of a system into an organization. It explains and expands upon system support strategies, user support plans, enterprise integration approaches, standards, and best practices. Discussion of organizational culture and change management is also explored.

    Prerequisites

    IT106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    MPM210 Introduction to Project Management

    This course provides an overview and introduction to the discipline of project management, coupled with an examination of the techniques that project managers use to complete their projects on schedule, within budgeted cost, and according to specified scope. Using materials based on the PMBOK® Guide (Guide to Project Management Body of knowledge, published by the Project Management Institute or PMI®), students learn the operational framework of project management relating to the project lifecycle of starting the project, organizing and planning the project, carrying out the work, and closing the project by using the project management process groups called Initiating Process Group, Planning Process Group, Executing Process Group, Monitoring and Controlling Process Group, and Closing Process Group as described in the PMBOK. This course also provides the basis for the more advanced development of project management skills in subsequent project management courses.

    Prerequisites

    IT106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    6

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    CS230 Data Structures

    In this course a student learns the principles behind both simple and advanced data structures. Study includes data types, arrays, stacks, queues, lists and trees. Students demonstrate understanding of these principles through the completion of several programs.

    Prerequisites

    IT152

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS346 User Interface Design

    Developing usable software products is vital in today’s competitive marketplace. This course provides in-depth coverage of the computer human interface, user interface design, user profiling, prototyping and usability testing. Note: this class does not require programming skills.

    Prerequisites

    IT106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS377 Object Oriented Methods

    Object Oriented Methods introduces the student to the basic concepts of object-oriented analysis and design. Use case modeling, class modeling and state modeling using common notations are covered. Completion of several exercises and a final project are required.

    Prerequisites

    IT152

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS455 Software Requirements Engineering

    Software Requirements Engineering introduces students to requirements elicitation, identification, definition, and documentation. Students will explore and practice elicitation techniques, define functional and non-functional requirements, write use-case scenarios, explore user interface alternatives, learn how to analyze and model requirements, and develop a requirements traceability matrix that spans the software development lifecycle.

    Prerequisites

    CS377  or IT422  or IT425

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS457 Software Design

    Software Design defines and describes the behavior of a software system. In this course, students learn to select and apply a design method and use a modeling notation to clearly communicate and document a software solution. A variety of design processes, methods, tools, and types of software designs are explored throughout the course. Requirements are incorporated into the design and traced to ensure completeness, correctness and consistency via the requirements traceability matrix. Students apply the theory by developing a software design specification.

    Prerequisites

    CS455

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    CS459 Software Testing

    Software Testing provides an overview of a variety of testing practices and methods, and then gives the students the opportunity to apply the theory as they perform software tests. This course focuses on the types of tests that are conducted during the software development lifecycle, such as unit testing, usability testing, operational testing, integration testing, stress testing, and system testing. Students develop a test procedure, a test plan, conduct system and usability testing, and write a test report that documents the results.

    Prerequisites

    CS457  or CS475

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT151 Introduction to Java Programming I

    This course introduces programming using the Java language. The basic concepts of object-oriented programming will be discussed in this course. Topics studied will include algorithmic logic, control structures, data and program design, objects and classes. Students will complete several Java programs before the end of this course. This course should prepare students to take Introduction to Java Programming II.

    Prerequisites

    MATH112; IT106  or CS104  or CS107

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    IT152 Introduction to Java Programming II

    This course continues the introduction of programming using the Java language. The foundation of object-oriented programming will be discussed in this course. Topics studied will include creation of classes and objects, object responsibilities and characteristics, and UML class diagrams. Students will complete several object-oriented Java programs before the end of this course. This course should prepare students to take Intermediate Java Programming I.

    Prerequisites

    IT151

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    MPM344 Project Risk Management

    Project Risk Management is a study of risk management in the context of projects and programs, with special focus on developing the competency of the project risk manager. This course addresses the area of non-speculative, business risk. Specific emphasis is placed on risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    MPM357 Project Performance and Quality Assurance

    In this course, students will explore quality assurance concepts and principles within the total project quality management framework in manufacturing or service organizations. Students will also study benchmarking, the contractual aspects of quality, quality tools and techniques that utilize statistical process control, process improvement, yield management, quality issues of incoming material control and quality audits.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    SWE311 The Software Engineering Profession

    This course introduces the student to the breadth of the software engineering profession. The importance of communication among a variety of stakeholders, the role of standards, and professional ethics are emphasized. Students investigate the historical and current practices in the software engineering discipline, and then explore its future directions.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE410 Software Processes

    This course gives the student an overview of the software process using the most common development methodologies currently used in industry. Students are introduced to IEEE standards for software processes. The relationship between software quality and process is emphasized with the benefits of process improvement.

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE440 Software Project Management

    Software Project Management covers the fundamentals of project management adapted to account for the unique aspects of software projects that differentiate these projects from other kinds of projects (manufacturing, R&D, business operations). Methods, tools, and techniques for planning and estimating, measuring and controlling, leading and directing, and managing risk in software projects are covered.

    Prerequisites

    SWE410   and MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE441 Human Elements in Projects and Organizations

    This course focuses on issues of productivity, quality of work, motivation, morale, communication, and coordination within computer science, software engineering, and business data processing projects and organizations. Communication and coordination among the layers of individuals, teams, projects, organizations, and business milieus are addressed. Emphasis can be placed on particular topics in the course, depending on the interests of the students, their sponsors, and the instructor. During each session, students will compile lists of action items for improving the topics covered. For students with work experience, their lists will reflect their experiences; students without work experience will prepare lists that reflect typical strengths, weaknesses, and best practices based on the presentations, readings, and experiences of their classmates and the instructor.

    Prerequisites

    IT106

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE481 Software Engineering Capstone I

    Software Engineering Capstone I involves the development of a software product from conception through deployment. Working in teams, students design and develop a software system based on user requirements. This course reinforces the principles of requirements engineering and software design. It includes the analysis and design of a software product and a plan for the overall project.

    Prerequisites

    CS376 or CS377   or CS475; SWE440

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    SWE482 Software Engineering Capstone II

    Software Engineering Capstone II continues the software product development that began in SWE481. Working in teams, students use their requirement and design specifications to develop and test a software product. This course requires the development and test of the product following the project plan.

    Prerequisites

    SWE481

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Computer Science/Engineering/Information Technology
    ×

    MPM332 Organizational Leadership

    In this course, students will explore techniques for effective leadership. The course will focus on skills necessary in a project environment. Students will examine how to lead others, stimulate purposeful innovation, build culture and manage change.

    Prerequisites

    MPM210   or MPM401 or Approval

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    MPM346 Contracts and Procurement

    This course covers the management of contracts and procurements for projects from the initial planning for contract work through contract close out. Special emphasis is provided on how procurement and proposals integrate into the project management process and how the project manager maintains control of the process.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    MPM357 Project Performance and Quality Assurance

    In this course, students will explore quality assurance concepts and principles within the total project quality management framework in manufacturing or service organizations. Students will also study benchmarking, the contractual aspects of quality, quality tools and techniques that utilize statistical process control, process improvement, yield management, quality issues of incoming material control and quality audits.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    4

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    MPM434 Project Scheduling and Cost

    This course exposes students to approaches, methods, and systems to ensure management success under demanding cost, schedule, and performance requirements. Conflict and risk management initiatives along with GANTT, PERT, and CPM scheduling methods are included.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    6

    Distribution

    Business
    ×

    MPM468 HR Project Management

    This course builds on the foundations of HR management and project management and covers the three areas in the PMBOK® Guide for project HR managers: organizational planning, staff acquisition, and team development. Within these areas emphasis is given to management and behavioral theories that impact change, communication, motivation, stress, conflict, negotiation, leadership and politics in a project-management environment.

    Prerequisites

    MPM401 or MPM210

    Corequisites

    None

    Credits

    6

    Distribution

    Business
    ×
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  • Tuition

    Tuition

    Total tuition for this degree program will vary depending on your educational needs, existing experience, and many other factors. The information below represents standard per-credit-hour tuition rates for CTU degree programs online and at our campuses.

    View our tuition resources for more information.

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  • Ways to Save

    Ways to Save

    Cost of this degree may be reduced based on one or more of the following:

    Students in CTU bachelor's degree programs typically bring a wealth of work experience and industry knowledge to the classroom. CTU Fast Track™ lets students earn college credit for what they already know. As a result, students can complete their degree up to 30% faster. Just as important, by passing multiple Fast Track exams, students can save up to 30% on tuition because they won’t have pay for the classes they test out of. There’s no additional cost for the exams and no penalty if a student fails to pass.*

    Take a look at the list of current Fast Track courses and see how much you can save with Fast Track. Military students, see the breakdown here.

    If you’re interested in pursuing a CTU master’s degree after your bachelor’s, talk to your advisor about Master’s Advantage. With this program, students enrolled in a bachelor’s program have the option to substitute two graduate courses for two undergraduate courses.

    *The ability to reduce time in school and/or reduce tuition depends on the number of Fast Track™ tests successfully passed. Fast Track™ program credits are unlikely to transfer. Not all programs are eligible for possible 30% reduction in time and money. Courses eligible subject to change.

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  • Outcomes

    Outcomes for Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Graduates

    Students who complete the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology should have an understanding of how to use technology to contribute to productivity. Over the course of the program, a graduate should gain:

    • Knowledge of at least one high-level programming language
    • An understanding of database systems
    • The ability to develop a software application and use software application processes
    • Insight into quality assurance, change control, and project management
    Career Growth for Software Systems Engineers

    Can I find a job? This is an important question, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that job opportunities for systems software developers are expected to grow by 17 percent from 2014 to 2024. This is considered faster than average and could lead to 186,600 new positions becoming available during that time.3 Of course a degree never guarantees a job, but an education can be essential to compete in the field.

    Whether students choose to complete their education at one of CTU’s campuses in Colorado Springs or Aurora, or online, students who complete the degree program may be able to seek employment as any of the following positions:4

    • Applications Developer or Engineer
    • Network Security Engineer
    • Software Developer or Engineer
    • Systems Analyst or Engineer
    • Test Engineer
    Headset icon Request more information now

Gainful Employment and Other Student Disclosures

Below you can find placement rates and other information tailored to your chosen campus and program. Certain disclosures are published on this website to assist students in understanding the facts about their programs.

Program Disclosure Information for:
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Employment Rates:

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- Graduation Rate

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1 Students may be required to complete some or all coursework for the program via Virtual Campus delivery.

2 Degrees pursued online may be slightly different than those pursued on campus.

3 http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/software-developers.htm#tab-6 (Visited 2/3/16)

4http://burning-glass.com/job-market-data/; The career titles are provided by Burning Glass. These results are based upon an analysis of over 7 million current job listings compiled from over 17,000 sources – the world’s most comprehensive repository of job openings. Students who earn this degree should not view this list as exhaustive and are not limited to only these options post-graduation. Some career titles listed above may not be entry-level and may require further education or job experience.

Copyright © 2016 Colorado Technical University (CTU). All rights reserved. No information may be duplicated without CTU's permission. The CTU logo is a registered trademark of Career Education Corporation. CTU cannot guarantee employment or salary. Not all programs are available to residents of all states. Programs vary by location and modality; see catalog for details. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. See the Accreditation & Licensure section for information on the agencies that approve and regulate the school's programs, including relevant complaint procedures here. Find employment rates, financial obligations and other disclosures below.

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